Best Sounding Acoustic Electric Guitar of All Time - Jacob Golden

Hannah Ryan
  Nov 30, 2022 4:24 PM

The best sounding acoustic electric guitar allows you to play both plugged in and acoustically. It's a versatile tool that every professional guitarist should have in their arsenal because of the wide variety of styles it can be applied to. A beginner guitarist would often start on either an electric or a standard acoustic guitar, making the acoustic-electric a bit of a mystery. At Jacob Golden, you'll learn about the essential aspects of this sort of instrument that you should be aware of. 

Our Top Picks

1. Best Overall: Washburn EA15ITB Festival Series Mini Jumbo Acoustic-Electric Guitar

This Washburn acoustic-electric guitar should seem familiar to viewers of MTV's Unplugged series. This inexpensive model is part of the Festival Series, widely used by artists on MTV's groundbreaking acoustic programs in the '90s. This product's tiny jumbo cutaway style allows for decent projection even when not plugged in. Quality materials were used in its construction, including a solid basswood top, back, and neck. 

2. Best Design: Gretsch 6 String Acoustic-Electric Guitar

Up next is a gorgeous instrument from Gretsch. It's simple to understand why this acoustic-electric guitar with six strings is so well-liked among Gretsch enthusiasts. We should start by pointing out that the pricing of this instrument is, shockingly, rather inexpensive. It's unusual to find such a high-quality instrument at this pricing point. It's made of high-quality components. Besides a nato neck and a walnut fingerboard, it has a basswood top, body, and back. A beautiful sound may be achieved by using these materials. The tone has depth and fullness that makes it quite appealing.

3. Best For Small Hands: Taylor BT2 Baby Taylor Acoustic Guitar

Those who play guitar professionally are undoubtedly familiar with the Baby Taylor line. These travel-friendly guitars are also easier to play for younger players or those with tiny hands. This acoustic-electric model includes all the best qualities of the Baby Taylor line. Small-scale guitars like the Baby Taylor have a shorter scale length of 22.75 inches and fewer frets than standard guitars have (19 frets).

4. Best High-End: Taylor 214ce Deluxe Grand Auditorium Cutaway Acoustic-Electric Guitar

In other words, you can't have a whole list without including Taylor. These days, we're going for the cutaway neck version of the Grand Auditorium (model number 214CE). Not only does it have a lot of power on its own, but it also has excellent clarity when hooked into an amplifier. It's a little more compact than the standard dreadnought size we've discussed so often. It's not a negative thing that you're doing that. The instrument is more convenient to move about and carry as a result. The electronics are dubbed "Expression," and they allow for extensive tonal modification.

5. Best Sound: Yamaha FG820 12-String Solid Top Acoustic Guitar

Yamaha is a reliable brand that won't break the budget but won't sacrifice quality either. To that end, we recommend the Yamaha FGX820, a sturdy top cutaway dreadnought with a bevy of features that should appeal to a broad range of players. This guitar is great for fingerpicking and comes with a solid spruce top, mahogany back and sides, and a rosewood fingerboard and bridge at a reasonable price. The scalloped bracing within the body enhances the instrument's tone performance, and it does so admirably.

Compare Products

TOP Choice
1
  • JG Score

    JG Score is measured by Jacob Golden. JG Score is objective because it can not be impacted by any manufacturers or sellers. Learn more

    8.0
  • Brand
    Washburn
TOP Choice
2
  • JG Score

    JG Score is measured by Jacob Golden. JG Score is objective because it can not be impacted by any manufacturers or sellers. Learn more

    9.2
  • Brand
    Gretsch
TOP Choice
3
  • JG Score

    JG Score is measured by Jacob Golden. JG Score is objective because it can not be impacted by any manufacturers or sellers. Learn more

    9.0
  • Brand
    Taylor Guitars
Most Saving
4
  • JG Score

    JG Score is measured by Jacob Golden. JG Score is objective because it can not be impacted by any manufacturers or sellers. Learn more

    8.8
  • Brand
    Taylor
Most Saving
5
  • JG Score

    JG Score is measured by Jacob Golden. JG Score is objective because it can not be impacted by any manufacturers or sellers. Learn more

    9.0
  • Brand
    Yamaha
Most Saving
6
  • JG Score

    JG Score is measured by Jacob Golden. JG Score is objective because it can not be impacted by any manufacturers or sellers. Learn more

    10.0
  • Brand
    D'Angelico
7
  • JG Score

    JG Score is measured by Jacob Golden. JG Score is objective because it can not be impacted by any manufacturers or sellers. Learn more

    9.4
  • Brand
    Yamaha
8
  • JG Score

    JG Score is measured by Jacob Golden. JG Score is objective because it can not be impacted by any manufacturers or sellers. Learn more

    9.4
  • Brand
    Yamaha
9
  • JG Score

    JG Score is measured by Jacob Golden. JG Score is objective because it can not be impacted by any manufacturers or sellers. Learn more

    9.4
  • Brand
    Fender
10
  • JG Score

    JG Score is measured by Jacob Golden. JG Score is objective because it can not be impacted by any manufacturers or sellers. Learn more

    9.4
  • Brand
    Yamaha

Last update on 2022-11-30 / Affiliate links / Images, Product Titles, and Product Highlights from Amazon Product Advertising API

FAQs

1. Can acoustic-electric guitar sound like an electric guitar?

The acoustic-electric guitars are very similar in appearance and tone to traditional acoustic guitars, but they produce an electric guitar sound.

best sounding acoustic electric guitar

2. Is it OK to put electric strings on an acoustic?

However, electric guitar strings may be used effectively on an acoustic guitar. In comparison to 80/20 bronze acoustic guitar strings or phosphor bronze acoustic guitar strings, nickel guitar strings are neither preferable nor less desirable. Feel-wise, it's simply not the same.

3. Which is more difficult to play, an acoustic or an electric guitar?

Traditionalists hold the belief that acoustic guitars are more difficult to master. This is because the strings are thicker and taller than on conventional electric guitars. The first few months are the most noticeable, but then your fingers become used to the instrument and get stronger.

Conclusion

Looking at all of these fantastic electric acoustics has been a lot of fun, and we hope that you've found your next axe among our recommendations. There's a lot to take in, but we've done our best to provide relevant material for people of many interests and backgrounds. Not one of the items on our recommended list has been rejected by us; therefore, we guarantee that you won't be dissatisfied with your purchase.

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